es, the bark of Japanese maple ‘Sango kaku’ is really that deep coral color.
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Gardenwise: Beautiful Bark Takes the Bite Out of Winter

Pictured Above: Yes, the bark of Japanese maple ‘Sango kaku’ is really that deep coral color By Susan Tito  As effective as they are in brightening a dreary winter, evergreens can only take you so far. So…much…green…and still more than a month to go before spring!  But if you think winter interest only comes from evergreens, think again. Just because a tree loses its leaves when temperatures drop doesn’t mean
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Gardenwise: A New Garden Mindset

 Above: prepare for spring by cooking up new color schemes with the help of Gertrude Jekyll’s “Colour Schemes for the Flower Garden” Cornell Cooperative Extension photo). By Susan Tito  Mother Nature has a timetable that we all follow to ensure continuity in the garden, yet it’s good for your soul to shake things up and try something new, if for no other reason than to have fun. Because a new
A closeup of variegated Japanese aucuba. Its colorful leaves look like they have been sprayed with gold-colored paint, enabling the plant to stand out in low light.
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Gardenwise: The Other Evergreens

Pictured Above: A closeup of variegated Japanese aucuba. Its colorful leaves look like they have been sprayed with gold-colored paint, enabling the plant to stand out in low light. By Susan Tito  Say the word “evergreen” and most people think of a pine, spruce, yew or other common coniferous plant. Don’t get me wrong, I love them all, but “evergreen” conjures up a different image for me: I think of
Hanging herbs to dry is one way to prolong summer’s bounty past the growing season.
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Gardenwise: What To Do With Your Herbs

by Susan Tito Strategically placed near my front door, my culinary herbs have served me well all summer long, seasoning many a tasty meal for my family and friends. Now that the days are getting shorter and nights are noticeably cooler, it’s time to decide what to do with these indispensable plants. Should they be overwintered indoors? Harvested and dried? Or should I (tearfully) bid them farewell and start from
Eastern baccharis grows in wetland environments, which makes it ideal for coastal gardens. Its flowers take on the appearance of cotton balls over time (Mina Vescera photo).
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Gardenwise: Make Your Coastal Garden Storm-Ready

Pictured Above: Eastern baccharis grows in wetland environments, which makes it ideal for coastal gardens. Its flowers take on the appearance of cotton balls over time | Mina Vescera photo by Susan Tito  Long Islanders lucky enough to live near the ocean, a bay or Long Island Sound know that their good fortune could change at a moment’s notice in the face of a catastrophic storm. Many homeowners who worry

Purple passionflower is about as tropical looking as it gets. With the proper protection, this beauty can survive a Long Island winter.
 | Loren Moss Meyer photo
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Gardenwise: Create Your Own Tropical Paradise

Pictured Above: Purple passionflower is about as tropical looking as it gets. With the proper protection, this beauty can survive a Long Island winter. | Loren Moss Meyer photo By Susan Tito  Emily Dickinson, who was more widely known for her gardening prowess than for her verse during her lifetime, said it best: “The heart wants what it wants.”  Those words ring true for every northern gardener who wanted to

A single planting of Madagascar periwinkle pops in this wooden planter.
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Gardenwise: Get Creative with Containers

Pictured Above: A single planting of Madagascar periwinkle pops in this wooden planter. All photos by Susan Tito by Susan Tito Even though my garden beds keep me more than busy throughout the growing season, I always plant up a few containers for my front porch and deck as a way to bring more color and variety into my designs.  The appeal of container gardening lies in its versatility. Have
Planting pollinator-friendly flowers, such as sunflowers (shown here), is one way to sustain bee populations. | Laura Klahre photo
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Gardenwise: Help Your Garden Bee Best

Pictured Above: Planting pollinator-friendly flowers, such as sunflowers, is one way to sustain bee populations. | Laura Klahre photo By Susan Tito  I have a confession: There was a time not long ago when I didn’t like bees. I know, that’s crazy talk coming from a longtime gardener! After all, most people (assuming they didn’t snooze through sixth grade science class) know how beneficial bees and other pollinators are to
The vibrant colors of this magnificent eastern redbud complement those of the tulips growing underneath it. | Vincent Simeone photo
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Gardenwise: Two Trees That Will Bring a Spring to Your Step This Season

Pictured Above: The vibrant colors of this magnificent eastern redbud complement those of the tulips growing underneath it. | Vincent Simeone photo by Susan Tito  There’s no denying that we gardeners love our spring-flowering trees. The natural world abounds with many attractive species, but to me our native flowering dogwood and eastern redbud represent the best of the bunch. When they are in bloom, it’s easy to forget that winter
Hellebores add much-needed winter interest to the garden— even snow can’t smother their beauty | Susan Tito photo
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Gardenwise: Say Hello to Hellebores

Pictured above: Hellebores add much-needed winter interest to the garden— even snow can’t smother their beauty | Susan Tito photo By Susan Tito  If you’ve planned your garden well, you probably had early-blooming flowers such as crocus and snowdrops already make a welcome appearance.  Don’t get me wrong, these plants are essential for kicking off the growing season, but if I had to name a must-have late winter/early spring plant,