Eastern baccharis grows in wetland environments, which makes it ideal for coastal gardens. Its flowers take on the appearance of cotton balls over time (Mina Vescera photo).
Column Gardenwise

Gardenwise: Make Your Coastal Garden Storm-Ready

Pictured Above: Eastern baccharis grows in wetland environments, which makes it ideal for coastal gardens. Its flowers take on the appearance of cotton balls over time | Mina Vescera photo by Susan Tito  Long Islanders lucky enough to live near the ocean, a bay or Long Island Sound know that their good fortune could change at a moment’s notice in the face of a catastrophic storm. Many homeowners who worry

Purple passionflower is about as tropical looking as it gets. With the proper protection, this beauty can survive a Long Island winter.
 | Loren Moss Meyer photo
Column Gardenwise

Gardenwise: Create Your Own Tropical Paradise

Pictured Above: Purple passionflower is about as tropical looking as it gets. With the proper protection, this beauty can survive a Long Island winter. | Loren Moss Meyer photo By Susan Tito  Emily Dickinson, who was more widely known for her gardening prowess than for her verse during her lifetime, said it best: “The heart wants what it wants.”  Those words ring true for every northern gardener who wanted to

A single planting of Madagascar periwinkle pops in this wooden planter.
Column Gardenwise

Gardenwise: Get Creative with Containers

Pictured Above: A single planting of Madagascar periwinkle pops in this wooden planter. All photos by Susan Tito by Susan Tito Even though my garden beds keep me more than busy throughout the growing season, I always plant up a few containers for my front porch and deck as a way to bring more color and variety into my designs.  The appeal of container gardening lies in its versatility. Have
Planting pollinator-friendly flowers, such as sunflowers (shown here), is one way to sustain bee populations. | Laura Klahre photo
Column Gardenwise

Gardenwise: Help Your Garden Bee Best

Pictured Above: Planting pollinator-friendly flowers, such as sunflowers, is one way to sustain bee populations. | Laura Klahre photo By Susan Tito  I have a confession: There was a time not long ago when I didn’t like bees. I know, that’s crazy talk coming from a longtime gardener! After all, most people (assuming they didn’t snooze through sixth grade science class) know how beneficial bees and other pollinators are to
The vibrant colors of this magnificent eastern redbud complement those of the tulips growing underneath it. | Vincent Simeone photo
Column Gardenwise

Gardenwise: Two Trees That Will Bring a Spring to Your Step This Season

Pictured Above: The vibrant colors of this magnificent eastern redbud complement those of the tulips growing underneath it. | Vincent Simeone photo by Susan Tito  There’s no denying that we gardeners love our spring-flowering trees. The natural world abounds with many attractive species, but to me our native flowering dogwood and eastern redbud represent the best of the bunch. When they are in bloom, it’s easy to forget that winter
Hellebores add much-needed winter interest to the garden— even snow can’t smother their beauty | Susan Tito photo
Column Gardenwise

Gardenwise: Say Hello to Hellebores

Pictured above: Hellebores add much-needed winter interest to the garden— even snow can’t smother their beauty | Susan Tito photo By Susan Tito  If you’ve planned your garden well, you probably had early-blooming flowers such as crocus and snowdrops already make a welcome appearance.  Don’t get me wrong, these plants are essential for kicking off the growing season, but if I had to name a must-have late winter/early spring plant,
Dracaena marginata surrounded by heartleaf philodendron (which closely resembles pothos) in a windowless office
Column Gardenwise

Gardenwise: Three (Nearly) Foolproof Houseplants to Get You Through The Winter

Pictured Above: Dracaena marginata surrounded by heartleaf philodendron (which closely resembles pothos) in a windowless office. By Susan Tito  It’s staying lighter longer, which means gardeners everywhere are getting giddy thinking about being able to soon play in the dirt. But don’t be too hasty in your countdown to spring: There’s still a lot of winter left!  That sobering reality had me seeking my green fix anywhere I could find