This Morning’s Bulletin — 7.23.14

Richard G. Hendrickson looks out over the Atlantic Ocean on a stormy day in Bridgehampton, New York (1930s). Photo: D.L. Hendrickson.
Richard G. Hendrickson looks out over the Atlantic Ocean on a stormy day in Bridgehampton, New York (1930s). Photo: D.L. Hendrickson.

Good Morning!

• Bridgehampton weather observer Richard Hendrickson, now 101 years old, is being honored by the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration this Sunday for his 84 years of service as a weather observer. Mr. Hendrickson often regales his guests with tales of the most interesting weather he’s seen, including his experiences in the Hurricane of 1938. This new, 80-year service award will be named by NOAA in his honor, because Mr. Hendrickson, the nation’s longest serving weather observer, is the first person in the country to have volunteered as a weather observer for 80 years.

 

 

A satellite-tagged tiger shark caught by team Free Nicky and named "Big Kahuna" by students at the Montauk School |Ryan Schosberg
A satellite-tagged tiger shark caught by team Free Nicky and named “Big Kahuna” by students at the Montauk School | Ryan Schosberg

• The 2nd Annual Shark’s Eye Tournament, a satellite tag-and-release tournament in Montauk this past weekend, was another banner weekend of highly competitive fishing, cutting-edge science and community involvement led by the Concerned Citizens of Montauk. Competing teams successfully captured, tagged and released 53 sharks, among which were 24 Mako, 27 blue and 2 tiger sharks. High-speed chase boats delivered scientists to boats in the competition to tag the caught sharks. The satellite-tagged sharks will be showing up on OCEARCH’S website in the coming days and pinging back their locations.  A Mako shark, caught by team Free Nicky, was tagged and named for Austin Marxe’s granddaughter, Isabella. Four more sharks were caught and tagged by the same team. They were a tiger, named Jaimie, another tiger named Big Kahuna by students at the Montauk School, a Mako named Chris Nic and a blue shark named Bonac by students at the Amagansett School.

• Sag Harborite Billy Joel has been tapped as the next recipient of the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song. Mr. Joel will receive the Prize in Washington, D.C. in November, and a series of events will coincide with the honor, including an honoree’s luncheon and musical performances.

 • The Peconic Land Trust still has spots available for its Explore Napeague Harbor kayak tour with Mike Bottini this evening, July 23 from 6 to 8 p.m. If you don’t have a kayak, there are rentals available. For more information call 631.283.3195.

And that’s the way things look at dawn’s light here today.

Beth Young

Beth Young has been covering the East End since the 1990s. In her spare time, she runs around the block, tinkers with bicycles, tries not to drown in the Peconic Bay and hopes to grow the perfect tomato. You can send her a message at editor@eastendbeacon.com

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