Letters: Alternative Energy on Long Island

To the Editor:

While Long Island offers a bounty of potential renewable power generation through wind, using solar power, too, would help get  New York to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s goal of a 70 percent renewable electric grid by 2030.

There’s a straightforward way to enlist solar power. Towns and villages can go beyond state energy efficiency requirements with so-called stretch codes, making state standards a minimum. Building codes can be made even more energy-efficient than they already are, by requiring rooftop solar power generation for new commercial construction. Upgrades to the electric power distribution system would not be required.

We have creative tools available to get us to 100 percent renewable energy, which is the minimum necessary requirement as we witness the havoc we have created by unmitigated burning of fossil fuels.

Sincerely,
James Haggerty
Stony Brook, NY

To the Editor: 

According to Beth Young’s excellent survey of offshore wind development coming to Long Island, there is a lot to look forward to (“Inside the Expanding World of Offshore Wind,” April 3).

Communities from Greenport to Southold are welcoming the economic opportunities that lay ahead as NYSERDA evaluates bids to further Governor Andrew Cuomo’s goal of 9,000 megawatts of offshore wind power by 2035. 

But with the South Fork wind turbine project still held up over where electric cables are to come onshore, it’s critical that NIMBY issues be kept to a minimum with these additional projects, and that stakeholders keep their eyes on the big picture, a Green New Deal that will benefit all Long Islanders. 

NYSERDA has done an excellent job of researching the environmental effects of wind turbines, and the effect on commercial fisheries, already harmed by global warming, can be mitigated. A full flow of information from NYSERDA will help people understand both the benefits and critical nature of these projects. 

Wind power is Long Island’s unique contribution to our state goal of a carbon-neutral New York by 2040. It is essential that it move forward smoothly and with conviction.

Jay Blackman
East Meadow, NY

To the Editor: 

Thank you for Beth Young’s comprehensive look at the state of play of offshore wind power (“Inside the Expanding World of Offshore Wind,” April 3). Long Island is ideally situated, both geographically and meteorologically, to help meet Governor Andrew Cuomo’s goal of statewide carbon neutrality by 2040. Enormous economic benefit will accrue to Long Island as these projects are brought online. There will be new jobs that the state requires must be filled with local labor and pay prevailing wage. Of the nearly 80 job categories associated with offshore wind, most are either white collar or union.

Wind farms will multiply Long Island jobs, as the supply chain and local manufacturing expand to meet their needs. Offshore wind would also mean hundreds of millions of dollars in direct and indirect investment in our area.

Along with solar power, energy efficiency and energy storage, those 9,000 megawatts of offshore wind power Governor Cuomo has planned should power a million homes. A 100% clean energy grid is within sight. It’s a good deal for Long Islanders.

Peggy Lyons
Floral Park, NY 

Letters to the editor may be emailed to editor@eastendbeacon.com or sent via U.S. Post to P.O. Box 665, New Suffolk, NY  11956. Please include your name, and a telephone number for verification purposes, and don’t submit any letters under false names. The Beacon will print all letters that are deemed to not be defamatory or obscene, and may edit submissions for clarity and grammar.

Letters to the editor may be emailed to editor@eastendbeacon.com or sent via U.S. Post to P.O. Box 665, New Suffolk, NY  11956. Please include your name, and a telephone number for verification purposes, and don’t submit any letters under false names. The Beacon will print all letters that are deemed to not be defamatory or obscene, and may edit submissions for clarity and grammar.

East End Beacon

The East End Beacon is your guide to social and environmental issues, arts & culture on the East End of Long Island.

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